Bug

The word "bug" has its roots (according to wikipedia) back to the 1800's when used to describe faults and difficulties. In software programming and web development, the word "bug" is sometimes used in a general way by users to describe any condition where the software does not do what the user intends for it to do.  That is a broad description of "bug," and is generally the "users" perspective.  The user's perspective generally does not coincide with a programmer's definition of "bug" which is more accurate since a programmer understands the technical details and the reasons why the issue is occurring.  So, when our firm talks about a "bug," here is the specific definition with some examples:

"Bug" - A flaw in the source code that is discovered after the software has gone through development and beta testing, that results in an error page. 

So, now that we have a definition, let's apply it to some situations.

  • A fill-in form is missing a field, called "Phone Number."  That is not a bug, that is a missing feature. That feature needs to be built.
  • A website has gone through development and beta testing, and is now live and in production.  A user submits a form and receives a error page 404 in their browser. That is a bug.
  • A report is missing from the application.  That is not a bug, that is a missing feature.  That feature was never built, and needs to be built.
  • A website has gone through development and beta testing, and is now live and in production.  A user clicks on a link and gets a blank page.  That is a bug.
  • When a user clicks submit on a form field, the phrase "Thanks for your submission" doesn't appear.  That is not a bug, that is a missing text message which was never built, and needs to be built.
  • During the development process, and prior to launching the site, a report shows an incorrect date field.  Finding out the display errors is part of the development and beta testing process, and is not a bug.  Working through these issues is part of the development process.

Bug